How to lift energy productivity in Freight Transport

A Roadmap to double energy productivity in Freight Transport by 2030” is now released for comment, and yours will be most welcome.

Urgent action is needed to generate more economic value from the energy used to move freight in Australia, as congested cities increasingly constrain productivity across the economy. Decisions made today can lock-in energy-intensive freight transport activities for decades.

Published by the Australian Alliance for Energy Productivity using extensive consultation with leading transport businesses, industry associations and government stakeholders, the roadmap aims to agree actions and priorities for both industry and government under the National Energy Productivity Plan (NEPP).

Transport is now Australia’s largest energy user, and with the freight task to grow 25% over the next decade, it will have ever-greater influence on congestion, climate change, air pollution and economic productivity across all sectors. The transport sector has some of the most cost-effective opportunities for energy and emissions savings, yet as the NEPP 2016 annual report notes, raising energy productivity in freight and commercial transport relies largely on voluntary action, and little progress is being made.

The Roadmap considers trends that will shape future energy use in the sector, including increasing urbanisation, a shift to renewable energy, vehicle electrification, connectivity and intelligent transport systems, automation and business model transformation. It gauges the extent of improvements possible via known technologies; it highlights the uncertainty expected from various levels of disruption that is coming; and it identifies measures to help the transition to a much more energy-productive freight sector.

Key suggestions will be incorporated into its final version, so please check it out and contribute your ideas.

 

Extra money to buy new trucks

Announcing a new service that unlocks government funding to buy new efficient trucks.

We can now help mid-to-large trucking companies access government incentives to invest in more efficient transport vehicles by reducing finance costs and paying cash from carbon credits.

Unique Opportunity

With no up-front costs, we can qualify fleet renewals for:

–             a 0.7% finance rate discount monthly

–             cash payments from carbon credits annually

Funded by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation, the finance discount lowers lease payments for the life of the lease and comes off your market interest rate.

The more fuel efficient your new vehicles are compared to those they replace, the greater the carbon credit cash bonus becomes, paid from an established Emissions Reduction Fund project annually for up to seven years.

Easy, Low Risk & No Fees

It’s an easy, low risk process with no up-front or ongoing charges that gives truck buyers extra cash on top of the fuel savings and other benefits that new trucks provide.

And it shows customers you are achieving real, measurable, government-backed environmental improvements as an innovator in your industry.

Why leave money on the table?

Don’t miss out! Contact me today to see how much funding is available for your new truck purchases in 2017 and beyond.

David Coleman

davidcoleman@westnet.com.au

0455 777 551

The Elephant Not in the Room

There was a renewed feeling of optimism at this week’s Emission Reduction Summit in Melbourne, with the COP21 Paris agreement providing a platform of global commitment and inspiration for the “Who’s Who of Climate Change Action” in attendance. Yet as we dined on delicious carbon neutral seafood washed down with carbon neutral fine wine, my thoughts turned to the elephant that wasn’t in the room.3rd Australian Emissions Reduction Summit.png

Transport recently surpassed electricity as the largest energy user in Australia, its emissions growing faster than any other sector. Freight will progressively exceed passenger transport energy use as Australia’s freight task grows faster than the economy, expecting to double the 2010 freight task by 2030 and triple by 2050.

Transport is notoriously difficult to decarbonise. Overwhelmingly and increasingly dependent on imported fossil fuels as local oil production drops and refineries close, the low oil price has the biofuels industry on its knees. Gas remains pre-commercial for long-haul trucking, rail and deep sea shipping, with no application to aviation. Our truck and bus fleet is one of the oldest in the OECD, with the average truck 14 years old and the average train locomotive more than 21 years old. Road consumes three quarters of transport energy yet we have no energy efficiency standards for cars or trucks, let alone trains, ships or aircraft.

Unsurprisingly, Transport has some of the largest and most cost-effective opportunities for improving energy productivity across all sectors of the economy.

Aside from the major airlines and a single rail operator, the rest of this vast, diverse sector was notably absent from the Summit conversation. No car or truck makers, no trucking companies, no fuel companies, no public transport agencies and no industry associations.

It’s little wonder there’s only a handful transport projects accessing the Emissions Reduction Fund and Clean Energy Finance Corporation incentives. Understanding the rules and jargon is like learning a foreign language, and it’s all risk with little reward, so the transport sector is just not engaged with the carbon reduction community, despite the financial support it offers.

Nevertheless, energy costs remain a significant and volatile input cost that is often the difference between winning and losing for most transport companies. So how can we better address this elephant of a sectoral opportunity that will be key to achieving net zero emissions?

Think the emissions scandal is all about Volkswagen? Think again.

The Volkswagen emission scandal is rocking the corporate world and it’s just the beginning. The CEO is gone, the workforce shamed and Germany’s flagship industry is a national embarrassment. But if you think it’s all about Volkswagen, think again, because it seems the system has been open to gaming by vehicle manufacturers for years.

Dodgy Test Regime

A new article from the The International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) exposes systemic flaws in the European vehicle testing regime. Poor regulatory oversight allows vehicle manufacturers to exploit tolerances in vehicle test procedures with impunity. By showing better fuel consumption and emissions ratings, the market rewards them as consumers vote with their wallets to save fuel costs and reduce environmental impacts. It results in a perverse incentive for manufacturers to spend as much of their efforts perfecting the test as they do improving efficiency of the vehicle itself.

Vehicles are tested in laboratories and on special test tracks to assess their various performance characteristics, including fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, to show the vehicle meets legislated minimum performance standards and support marketing claims. Volkswagen vehicles are now found to be compliant under test conditions but not in ordinary use, with software installed to let the vehicle pass the test yet operate in service with much higher emissions.

Clearly illegal and unethical, Volkswagen is deservedly copping the brunt right now, but the scandal reveals a culture among vehicle manufacturers who can potentially ‘game’ a system that has holes in it so great you could drive a B-Double truck through, completely legally of course. The integrity of all European vehicle fuel consumption and emissions claims are now in doubt because benchmarks can be set on test tracks with downhill slopes with favourable cambers to improve performance and specially-prepared tyres hardened in an oven beforehand to provide the least rolling resistance during the test. Hardly real-world driving conditions. You can’t blame manufacturers for using the most economical drivers, tuning vehicles to suit a track of their choosing and any other methods to give the best test score, because the score influences sales. The point is, however, vehicles cannot repeat these high standards when used by you and me on public roads.

We don’t accept wind-assisted track and field times for world athletics records because it’s a not a true measure of human capability. Likewise, we shouldn’t accept these vehicle performance figures.

The ICCT found the gap between test figures and real-world in service performance is ‘ever-growing’ – from 10% in 2002, to 35% in 2014 and is on track to be 49% by 2020. What confidence can the public – private consumers and businesses alike – have in a score that could be 50% out?

Implications for Australia

Australians are vehicle technology takers, relying on the standards of Europe, USA and Japan to drive fuel and emissions efficiency improvements. Without our own minimum fuel efficiency standards we become a dumping ground for the world’s noncompliant vehicles. With Canada, China, Brazil and Mexico implementing their own minimum fuel efficiency standards, this gap is growing too. As an island continent there’s no secondary market for used vehicles, so the impacts of inferior fuel and emissions performance of “hand-me-down” technology will be felt in Australia for years.

Data is the key constraint in this aspect of the road vehicle industry. People rely on the integrity of performance claims in sales brochures, and expect the protection of regulatory oversight. Buyers of passenger cars can check the Green Vehicle Guide to compare vehicles, yet the ICCT suggests green vehicle ratings are based on desktop review of now dubious test calculations.

Trucking companies already have difficulty believing the fuel efficiency claims of manufacturers because Australian conditions are so different to the test tracks of Europe and America, so large transporters invest in their own R&D by testing trucks themselves before purchase because they know the value of getting their fuel figures right before committing to substantial investments with huge running costs over a truck’s life driven by fuel usage and volatile fuel prices.

Small and medium transport companies may not have the resources or skills to test new vehicles properly before buying. There’s no green vehicle guide for heavy vehicles. The closest offering is the NSW government’s Green Trucks Partnership which brings together vehicle users and manufacturers to test various fuel saving technologies in real-life Australian applications with independent reporting on benefits achieved against claims made by technology proponents. The information is shared in case studies on the Green Trucks website.

Australia needs its own standards

Transport is the second largest user of energy in the Australian economy after electricity and is growing faster. Introducing minimum fuel efficiency standards is one of the easiest, cheapest and most effective ways we can save energy costs, reduce carbon and air pollution emissions, and improve fuel security. Australia must take charge of its destiny and develop its own minimum fuel efficiency standards for light and heavy road vehicles. We can learn from Europe’s woes and stringently test vehicles prior to service then follow the USA’s lead and actually test each vehicle type once in service to validate real world performance. Regulation without enforcement provides only a false sense of security and blind faith in marketing claims which, as Volkswagen has shown, fail under scrutiny.

Transport Energy Audit Standard : seeking your views

Implementing energy audit recommendations usually achieves significant cost savings. However the current Australian Standard for energy audits is based on auditing commercial buildings and is not practical for transport.

Transport operations have characteristics that produce variability in energy performance and make fleet energy use difficult to model:

–          Very high variation in routes, loading and traffic conditions;

–          Vehicle operators strongly influence energy performance;

–          Regulations, such as noise or load limits, provide constraints.

A new transport-specific standard, AS/NZS 3598.3 Energy Audits-Transport Sector, will be the first of its kind internationally. It is intended to help transport operators find the approach best suited to their business for assessing energy efficiency and reducing costs .

To develop a standard of practical value, the consultation process seeks additional expertise to address the specific data measurement and analysis needs of the road, rail, aviation and maritime industries.

You can contribute at the Standards Hub Website as referenced in the inside cover of the draft standard, available here.

Comments close on 10 April 2014.

Carbon Neutral Transport webinar

The “Carbon Neutral Transport” webinar I ran recently for the Chartered Institute of Logistics & Transport Australia was well received and the discussion afterwards generated some ideas for the future.

For those who missed it, here’s a link to the recording, based on the following brief:

 

What advantages does going Carbon Neutral offer the Transport industry?

To be Carbon Neutral a transport operator must save fuel relentlessly, use clean fuels and offset their residual emissions.

Saving fuel means saving money, and our customers increasingly demand energy-efficient and low carbon transport.

So why isn’t every transport firm going Carbon Neutral?

In this webinar, you will:

–          Learn what Carbon Neutral means in the transport sector;

–          See what’s being done to break down the barriers; and

–          Find out how the Business Case for Carbon Neutral Transport really stacks up!

Shell’s Geelong Refinery – Can we turn Doom & Gloom into a Clean Fuel Boom?

With Shell seeking buyers for its 59-year old refinery, deemed uncompetitive in the traditional hydrocarbons market due to its small scale and old technology relative to Asian competitors, what innovative options can Shell and the Geelong community explore to develop a sustainable asset for long term community wealth?

California provides a guide. A petroleum refinery there is being revamped as an advanced biofuel refinery, with United Airlines underwriting the investment through commercial commitment to buy its renewable jet fuel.

The lesson for Geelong is that partnerships between large fuel users, refiners and biofuel technologists offer the opportunity to use waste and non-food organics to produce low-carbon “drop-in” fuels. Feedstocks would be sourced locally. Ready-made pipeline and terminal infrastructure will efficiently get product to market. Victoria positions itself as renewable fuel hub for international and domestic airlines, land and sea transport operators, miners, farmers and industrial customers.

Sounds like win-win-win, but who can pull it together?